Impresa of Isabella d’Este

When Isabella d’Este first arrived in Mantua, she began having a set of rooms (camerini) built to showcase her books, artworks, and musical instruments, and to provide her with spaces for reflection, contemplation, and intimate music-making. Her first camerini were in the Castel San Giorgio in Mantua, adjacent to the Camera degli Sposi, which is decorated with frescoes … More Impresa of Isabella d’Este

Phenomenal Women

Reblogged from MissPen Aristocratic Daughters We think of nuns as living a secluded life, peacefully going about their daily prayers and rituals. However, at the threshold of the Italian Renaissance, the life of a nun offered a creative solution to women who wanted to pursue interests outside of keeping a home and raising children. For … More Phenomenal Women

Camilla Scarampa

Camilla Guidoboni Scarampa, or Scarampi, was an important literary figure of the 15th-century. She was held in great esteem by Matteo Bandello who dedicated his 13th Novelle to her. She is thought to have been born in Mantua or Milan of the family Scarampo Scarampi. (The blog photo in the header is not Camilla, but … More Camilla Scarampa

Veronica Gambara

Veronica Gambara’s (1485-1550) family boasted a number of distinguished intellectuals, including her grandmother and great-aunt, Ginevra and Isotta Nogarola. Educated in literature, philosophy, and languages at an early age, Veronica became a poet early in life. She married her cousin, Giberto X, Countof Coreggio, in 1509.       They were apparently well suited. Giberto felt … More Veronica Gambara

Tullia d’Aragona

By Maggie McNeil (read her blog here). It is not holiness, but arrogance displayed to take away the greatest gift—free will— bestowed by God from the beginning of time.  –  Tullia d’Aragona, Sonnet XXXV The existence of courtesans is a glaring refutation of neofeminist dogma about objectification, the eternal victimhood of whores, etc; the fact … More Tullia d’Aragona