Banquets in Etruria

Estruscan Banquets by Mark Cartwright on https://www.ancient.eu/article/1024/etruscan-banquets/ published on 27 February 2017 The Etruscans, who flourished in central Italy between the 8th and 3rd century BCE, were noted in antiquity for their sumptuous banquets, drinking parties, and general easy-living. Although such pleasures were probably restricted to the wealthy elite, strong evidence of the popularity of the practice … More Banquets in Etruria

Clothing in Etruria

Etruscan Clothing by Mark Cartwright on https://www.ancient.eu/article/1018/etruscan-clothing/ published on 17 February 2017 The clothing of the ancient Etruscans, a civilization which flourished in central Italy between the 8th and 3rd century BCE, can be seen in many media of their art including wall paintings, bronze sculpture, stone relief carvings, and painted figures on terracotta funerary urns, as … More Clothing in Etruria

Winding Thread the Renaissance Way

How do you wind your thread around you replica bobbin? Comment below!! Reblog from Medieval Silkwork Blog at http://www.medievalsilkwork.com/2009/04/winding-up-part-ii.html ******************************************************************** I’ve made it a point to assemble a period sewing kit, which includes a few types of bobbin for thread. When taking the thread off of the paper bobbin they come with, I’ve found it a … More Winding Thread the Renaissance Way

To Make a Red Gamurra

Originally posted on Cathelina di Alessandri:
You can read the full write up about this dress in The Fifth Annual Italian Renaissance Costuming Challenge. I usually make my gamurre bodices by cutting out the lining the finished size, the fashion fabric including the hem allowance, hemming the pieces and whip stitching them together. For my…

Tullia d’Aragona

By Maggie McNeil (read her blog here). It is not holiness, but arrogance displayed to take away the greatest gift—free will— bestowed by God from the beginning of time.  –  Tullia d’Aragona, Sonnet XXXV The existence of courtesans is a glaring refutation of neofeminist dogma about objectification, the eternal victimhood of whores, etc; the fact … More Tullia d’Aragona

Nec Spe Nec Metu: Isabella d’Este

Reblogged from https://aneardepthexperience.wordpress.com/2013/06/16/nec-spe-nec-metu-superman-caravaggio-and-hope/ Nec Spe Nec Metu: Superman, Caravaggio and Hope … The phrase ‘nec spe nec metu’ probably has its origins in Stoicism, meaning ‘neither hope nor fear’  or, more pedantically ‘without hope, without fear’  (perhaps from ancient medicine and Silesio; perhaps adapted from general Roman orations) – implying a kind of resigned equilibrium and forbearance. … More Nec Spe Nec Metu: Isabella d’Este