Aromatario del Giglio – The Apothecary of the Lily – Winter Line

This is the Aromatario del Giglio (Apothecary of the Lily), an extension of the La Bella Donna living history blog. I am Gigi, an herbalist and living history participant who loves to indulge herself in historical cosmetic and apothecary products made from authentic recipes of the medieval and renaissance time periods. Let me share my research finds with you and help you indulge yourself in luxurious bath and body products made from authentically reproduced recipes with historical origins (1300 AD – 1600 AD). Each product is made with love by hand in my personal still-room with organic ingredients. I plan to bring this apothecary to Gulf Wars, a week long living history event in Mississippi held annual in the spring. Check out the campaign here https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/la-bella-donna-historical-apothecary/x/7223800

The Winter Line

This is Polvere di Salvia (Sage Powder), our 16th Century Italian tooth cleanser and breath freshener. Another perfect addition to your living history kit or your modern organic eco-toilette!

Caterina Sforza, Alessio Piemontese, and Gervase Markham all recorded recipes to freshen the breath and clean the teeth. This recipe was inspired by an English recipe of the late 16th Century to whiten the teeth and freshen the breath. Made with organic ingredients by hand in the La Bella Donna still room. https://www.etsy.com/listing/213995659/polvere-di-salvia-sage-tooth-powder?ref=related-0

polvere di salvia open on granite

This cheek and lip stain is made from organic ingredients combined exactly as Caterina Sforza recommended in her 15th Century Book of Secrets, ‘Gli Experimenti’. In that manuscript she recorded over 25 beauty recipes. This one is called ‘Rossetto ligiadrissimo et eccellentissimo’ (Rouge very light and most excellent). The recipe was translated by me, made with love, and packaged with care in a recycled glass container. https://www.etsy.com/listing/209710241/rossetto-15th-century-italian-rouge?ref=related-5

rossetto deck

15th century aromatic body powder, anyone? Body and facial powders were recorded by Alessio Piedmont, Caterina Sforza, Isabella Cortese, and Hugh Plat in the 15th and 16th centuries across Europe. These powders were used to scent the body, absorb moisture, prevent chaffing, and to achieve a pale look. They were composed of a powder base of ground orris root, rice powder, crushed pearls, or talc and scented with ground cloves, rose petals, lavender, nutmeg, cinnamon, musk, ambergris, and rosemary. Made with organic ingredients by hand in the La Bella Donna still room. https://www.etsy.com/listing/213991169/polvere-eccelentissima-excellent-16th?ref=shop_home_active_9

polvere eccelentissima mortar

Alessio Piemontese, a 16th Century alchemist, wrote that his Imperial Oil should be used, “to perfume the hair or beard of a man, to rub his hands or gloves with, and to put also into the water wherein a princes or great mans clothes be washed…”

So I have used his recipe to make this oil for the Great Men and Princes that may wish to have their beard, hair, or clothes scented and conditioned with such an oil. This listing is for a 1 ounce blue glass bottle of Imperial Oil.

oglio imperiale deck

All these products were handcrafted in my own personal still- room in New Orleans, Louisiana. I use primary source recipes from Renaissance and Medieval manuscripts along with organic, all-natural ingredients that do not contain chemical preservatives, artificial fragrances or synthetic chemicals. I use pure herbs, spices, oils, vegetables, and occasionally a mineral pigment known as iron oxide. THAT’S IT. My products are safe and simple as well as documentable 🙂

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